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    The Congressional Budget Office’s 2011 Long-Term Budget Outlook

    The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) recently published an update of its long-term outlook for the budget and concluded that the federal budget will continue to face intense pressures from the aging of the population and growth in health care costs.i These pressures will push up spending on Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. If taxes are not increased or spending is not cut, CBO projects that interest costs will climb and federal debt will grow to levels that will damage our economy. CBO’s views about the long-term outlook have not changed much from last year.


    Summary of CBO’s Preliminary Analysis of the President’s...

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    The Congressional Budget Office's (CBO) An Analysis of the President's FY 2013 Budget is yet another indication from the nonpartisan budget office that the nation continues to face serious long-term fiscal challenges. If the President's proposals were adopted, CBO estimates that:


    Summary of CBO Update on Budget and Economic Outlook

    The latest report by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) on the outlook for the U.S. budget and economy highlights the costs of the ongoing weakness in our economy and uncertain direction of our nation’s fiscal policies (1). On the economy, CBO projects that a full recovery from the recession will not be complete until 2017—almost a decade after it started in December 2007. On the budget, CBO warns that if current policies are continued, federal debt is on an “explosive path” over the long run.


    Long-Term Implications of the Budget Control Act of 2011

    This summer, the Congress passed and the president signed the Budget Control Act of 2011 (BCA) that put in place a process for reducing the deficit. The BCA imposed caps on future discretionary spending and empowered a bipartisan, bicameral committee (the “Supercommittee”) to identify additional deficit reduction by Thanksgiving. Over the next 10 years, the spending caps are projected to reduce deficits by approximately $900 billion, and the Supercommittee is charged with finding $1.5 trillion of additional savings.


Fiscal Confidence Index

Survey: Modeled after the Consumer Confidence Index, the Fiscal Confidence Index is a monthly national survey that measures public opinion about the national debt.

The Tax Reform Opportunity

Video: Our tax code is complex, unfair, and insufficient. Learn more about the opportunity we have to reform and improve tax policy.